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410 results found for Weeds, Diseases and Pests
Deer are beautiful creatures, but seeing them dining on your landscape plants quickly makes their beauty fade. CAES News
Deer are beautiful creatures, but seeing them dining on your landscape plants quickly makes their beauty fade.
Deer Problem
Georgia’s whitetail deer have reached a nutritional stress period and the current drought situation only compounds the issue. There tends to be two nutritional stress periods during the year for whitetail: the end of summer and the end of winter. Right now, we are at the precipice of the winter stress period.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension wildlife experts recommend following the H.E.R.L. model for wildlife damage management. This step-by-step method starts with 'H' for habitat modification or harassment; 'E' for exclusion; 'R' for repellent or removal; and 'L' for lethal control. Habitat modification or harassment and exclusion are the first two choices; however, these methods are often impractical, expensive or ineffective for armadillos. CAES News
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension wildlife experts recommend following the H.E.R.L. model for wildlife damage management. This step-by-step method starts with 'H' for habitat modification or harassment; 'E' for exclusion; 'R' for repellent or removal; and 'L' for lethal control. Habitat modification or harassment and exclusion are the first two choices; however, these methods are often impractical, expensive or ineffective for armadillos.
Armadillo Control
As the armadillo spreads farther north, the common question becomes, “How do I control these animals?” Armadillos feed primarily on invertebrates under the soil surface and the rooting action that takes place while they forage often damages lawns and landscapes.
Healthy peanuts compared to peanuts infected with white mold disease. CAES News
Healthy peanuts compared to peanuts infected with white mold disease.
La Nina Weather Pattern
A La Nina weather pattern is providing warmer winter temperatures for Georgia residents, sparking farmers’ concerns about potential plant diseases at the start of production season in early spring.
Damage caused by cowpea curculio on Southern peas. CAES News
Damage caused by cowpea curculio on Southern peas.
Black-eyed Peas
Black-eyed peas have long been a symbol of New Year’s luck in the American South, but black-eyed pea farmers aren’t feeling that fortunate this year.
Corn and rye residue, part of a conservation tillage system on Barry Martin's farm in Hawkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Corn and rye residue, part of a conservation tillage system on Barry Martin's farm in Hawkinsville, Georgia.
Conservation Tillage Conference
For decades, farmers who have embraced conservation production have seen increased soil health, reduced irrigation demands and lowered economic risk. For the past 17 years, Georgia farmers interested in adopting new conservation practices for their farms – including those looking to swap best practices with other conservation tillers – have gathered at Georgia’s annual Conservation Production Systems Training Conference.
Leaf spot damage seen on a peanut leaf. CAES News
Leaf spot damage seen on a peanut leaf.
Leaf Spot Disease
Georgia peanut growers are experiencing problematic leaf spot diseases this year due to susceptible varieties and weakening fungicide treatments, according to Albert Culbreath and Tim Brenneman, plant pathologists at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus.
UGA weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks during the Sunbelt Field Day in 2015. He is among the scheduled presenters during this year's field day on July 25, 2019. CAES News
UGA weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks during the Sunbelt Field Day in 2015. He is among the scheduled presenters during this year's field day on July 25, 2019.
Extension Award
World-renowned researcher Stanley Culpepper, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed scientist on the UGA Tifton Campus, will receive the 2016 regional Excellence in Extension Award from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU).
This photo represents pseudo-colored MRI T1 maps of a Zika-infected chicken embryo. The embryo was infected with the Zika virus at a time associated with the first trimester of a human pregnancy. The photo captures a well-developed chicken embryo within the egg, and lesion within the brain, attributed to the Zika virus infection. CAES News
This photo represents pseudo-colored MRI T1 maps of a Zika-infected chicken embryo. The embryo was infected with the Zika virus at a time associated with the first trimester of a human pregnancy. The photo captures a well-developed chicken embryo within the egg, and lesion within the brain, attributed to the Zika virus infection.
Zika Virus Research
A University of Georgia graduate student is using early stage chicken embryos to monitor the progression of the Zika virus. By collecting data on how the virus affects brain development, researchers at UGA can pinpoint the best treatments to stop or slow the progression of early-stage microcephaly, a rare birth defect linked to the Zika virus.
Hay bales outline a field in Butts County, Georgia. CAES News
Hay bales outline a field in Butts County, Georgia.
To Overseed or Not?
While drivers spend extra time in the car in search of fuel during the recent gasoline shortage, farmers are dealing with a more long-term shortage — a low supply of hay for their livestock.
All stages of fall armyworms, from tiny larvae to large caterpillars, live in a growth chamber on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia. The worms are used to conduct research on how best to control the pest. CAES News
All stages of fall armyworms, from tiny larvae to large caterpillars, live in a growth chamber on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia. The worms are used to conduct research on how best to control the pest.
Worm Army
Georgia farmers are never surprised to see fall armyworms munching on their precious corn, sorghum and forage hay crops. They just hope for a low number of armyworms. This year’s population of the tiny destroyers, described as an “Armageddon-type outbreak” by University of Georgia entomologist David Buntin, is far from low.