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CAES News
Routines for Kids
Once the school year starts, developing and keeping a consistent schedule is vital to children’s health and well-being, says Diane Bales, a child development specialist with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
5-year-old Parks Powell plays an educational game on his parents' iPad. CAES News
5-year-old Parks Powell plays an educational game on his parents' iPad.
Kids and Tablets
Tablets have become commonplace in today’s classrooms, even as early as preschool or kindergarten. If used appropriately, these touchscreen devices can enhance instruction, according to a UGA Cooperative Extension specialist.
High-calorie drinks lined up in refrigerator. June 2009. CAES News
High-calorie drinks lined up in refrigerator. June 2009.
Healthy Lunch
Are you worried about packing a healthy lunch for your kids this school year? If so, you are not alone; lots of parents struggle to provide nutritious foods that their kids will actually enjoy eating every day for lunch.
Lyndon Waller, left, a DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market program assistant, and Rickeia Stewart, a UGA Extension administrative assistant in DeKalb County, are part of the team helping to bring fresh vegetables to underserved communities in DeKalb County. CAES News
Lyndon Waller, left, a DeKalb Mobile Farmers Market program assistant, and Rickeia Stewart, a UGA Extension administrative assistant in DeKalb County, are part of the team helping to bring fresh vegetables to underserved communities in DeKalb County.
Metro Mobile Markets
Summer isn’t quite the same without fresh corn, beans, okra and tomatoes, but many Georgians don’t have easy access to the state’s bounty of produce.
CAES News
Agricultural Education
On a typical Friday morning in the middle of the semester, Abigail Borron's students aren't in class. They're out working in food pantries across north Georgia, helping to give a face to food insecurity.
Unlike many blueberry plants, Blue Suede holds on to its foilage throughout the year.  It is brightly colored in the fall and green in the winter. CAES News
Unlike many blueberry plants, Blue Suede holds on to its foilage throughout the year.  It is brightly colored in the fall and green in the winter.
Edible Landscaping
The key to creating a visually appealing edible landscape is the artful combination of annuals and perennials. Most edible plants can act as substitutes for annual plants, but there are some options that can substitute for shrubs, vines and small trees.
Georgia 4-H plans several camps throughout the year especially for military youth. A military youth camper is shown practicing rock climbing at Camp Wahsega near Dahlonega, Georgia. CAES News
Georgia 4-H plans several camps throughout the year especially for military youth. A military youth camper is shown practicing rock climbing at Camp Wahsega near Dahlonega, Georgia.
Military Kid Camps
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is offering a variety of summer camps geared specifically toward military youths. These camps are part of UGA Extension’s Military Outreach program and are offered at little to no cost to dependents of U.S. military members between the ages of 14 and 18.
The 2014 UGA Radon Education Program Poster Contest first place entry. CAES News
The 2014 UGA Radon Education Program Poster Contest first place entry.
Homebuyers Beware
You found a house that fits most, or maybe even all, of your requirements. Now it’s time to hire a home inspector to ensure the house is structurally sound and safe. Although this is not a required step in the homebuying process in Georgia, it is one that is highly recommended.
Forrest Goodfellow, a graduate student in University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center, cuts into a chicken egg. CAES News
Forrest Goodfellow, a graduate student in University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center, cuts into a chicken egg.
Stem Cell Safety
An overwhelming number of researchers still struggle within the black hole of the effectiveness and safety of stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. While the complexity of understanding how neurons grow, connect and function has long been studied, it remains a mystery, one that graduate student Forrest Goodfellow in the University of Georgia Regenerative Bioscience Center is helping unravel.
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach. CAES News
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach.
Produce and Pathogens
Mike Doyle doesn’t eat raw bean sprouts, medium-rare hamburgers or bagged salads. He isn’t on a special diet, but as director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, he studies the food pathogens that sicken thousands of Americans each year. For a time, foodborne illness was most often connected with undercooked meats; today, 33 percent of cases are tracked back to raw produce.