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In addition to spring cleaning, UGA Cooperative Extension Family and Consumer Sciences agents recommend freshening the look of your home's decor. A few carefully placed pillows, wall art or an area rug can make a huge difference. CAES News
In addition to spring cleaning, UGA Cooperative Extension Family and Consumer Sciences agents recommend freshening the look of your home's decor. A few carefully placed pillows, wall art or an area rug can make a huge difference.
Give indoor and outdoor spaces a fresh look for spring
Spring is in the air! For me, that also means it is time to update my home. Research has shown that we spend 90 percent of our time indoors, so let’s make our homes as comfortable and beautiful as possible. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension provides the following helpful hints to create wonderful spaces for our homes this season.
Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia. CAES News
Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia.
Winter rains to impact forage management
According to Lisa Baxter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s newest forage agronomist, an unusually wet winter will cause problems with summer forage crop quality in Georgia.
University of Georgia Professors Scott Jackson, Dean Pringle and Manpreet Singh, recently graduated from LEAD21, a leadership-development program designed for land-grant university professionals. Pictured left to right at the graduation ceremony in Alexandria, Virginia, are Susan Sumner, board chair of LEAD21, Joe Broder, coordinator of LEAD21 faculty activities at UGA, Laura Perry Johnson, UGA associate dean of Extension, Jackson, Pringle, Singh and Brian Kowalkowski, LEAD21 program chair. CAES News
University of Georgia Professors Scott Jackson, Dean Pringle and Manpreet Singh, recently graduated from LEAD21, a leadership-development program designed for land-grant university professionals. Pictured left to right at the graduation ceremony in Alexandria, Virginia, are Susan Sumner, board chair of LEAD21, Joe Broder, coordinator of LEAD21 faculty activities at UGA, Laura Perry Johnson, UGA associate dean of Extension, Jackson, Pringle, Singh and Brian Kowalkowski, LEAD21 program chair.
CAES faculty graduate from LEAD21 land-grant leadership program
Three University of Georgia professors were among the 79 individuals who completed the 14th class of the LEAD21 leadership-development program. Scott Jackson, Dean Pringle and Manpreet Singh, all faculty in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, represented UGA in the program, which is designed for land-grant institutions and their strategic partners from across the nation.
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of excess rainfall this winter, peanut plantings could be delayed in some fields. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of excess rainfall this winter, peanut plantings could be delayed in some fields.
El Nino impacts Georgia agriculture
Farmers who might face a delayed planting season can thank El Niño for Georgia’s exceedingly wet winter, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist. Row crop and vegetable producers usually begin planting their crops in late March through May, but excessive rainfall and cloudy conditions in January and February have left many fields soaked and soggy.
This summer, teens from across the nation will gather in Georgia and Colorado for camps designed just for military kids by the Georgia 4-H Military Partnership. The camps begin in June, but adult volunteer leaders are needed now. CAES News
This summer, teens from across the nation will gather in Georgia and Colorado for camps designed just for military kids by the Georgia 4-H Military Partnership. The camps begin in June, but adult volunteer leaders are needed now.
Military Teen Leadership Summits seek adult volunteers
Georgia 4-H is searching for adult volunteer leaders for this summer’s 2019 Military Teen Summits coordinated by the Georgia 4-H Military Partnership. The summits will occur in Jekyll Island, Georgia, Dahlonega, Georgia, and Estes Park, Colorado, through funding provided by several entities. The camps begin in June and conclude in early-August.
Sam Pardue, dean and director, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Sam Pardue, dean and director, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Making Georgia and CAES No. 1 in Agriculture
As we celebrate National Agriculture Week 2019, many in the Southeast are still struggling to recover from hurricanes, tornadoes, whitefly outbreaks and record-breaking rainfall. Nature is both the nemesis and nurturer of agriculture - the ultimate “can’t live with it, can’t live without it” dilemma.
Basil is one of several herbs recommended for gardening this spring. It's an annual that prefers sun and moderate moisture. CAES News
Basil is one of several herbs recommended for gardening this spring. It's an annual that prefers sun and moderate moisture.
Try planting herbs in your garden
Humans have used herbs since early times for medicinal purposes, for flavoring food and for fragrance. Their magical properties are entwined in the lore of many cultures and their flavor has added distinctive character to numerous regional dishes. Many modern medicines include plant parts from herbs in either a natural or synthesized state. And there is a growing field of research in pharmacognosy, as scientists look again at herbal remedies.
Irrigation of research plots on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. Be careful not to apply too much water as it can be just as costly as under watering. CAES News
Irrigation of research plots on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. Be careful not to apply too much water as it can be just as costly as under watering.
Soil sensors can prevent homeowners from overwatering gardens
Farmers know water is a valuable resource, and many farmers are now using soil sensors in their fields to control soil moisture content. Small-plot and home gardeners can take a cue from professional farmers by becoming more conscientious about when they apply irrigation to home landscapes and gardens throughout spring and summer, says Andre da Silva, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist.
Controlling the erosion of your soil can improve your vegetable garden and protect the soil. Soil erosion is related to multiple factors, including the type of soil and how much cover is holding the soil. CAES News
Controlling the erosion of your soil can improve your vegetable garden and protect the soil. Soil erosion is related to multiple factors, including the type of soil and how much cover is holding the soil.
Controling soil erosion improves vegetable gardens
The key to successfully growing delicious vegetables is maintaining high-quality soil. We sometimes neglect to protect our soil, then rainfall comes and erosion carries our crops away. Erosion control is something that must be considered in gardens because it can protect the precious soils.

About the Newswire

Formerly referred to as FACES, our media newswire continues to feature stories from the CAES news team relating to family, agricultural, consumer and environmental sciences, as well as UGA Extension news.

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Sharon Dowdy Senior Public Relations Coordinator
Merritt Melancon Public Relations Coordinator
J. Faith Peppers Director of Public Affairs
Clint Thompson Public Relations Coordinator