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A UGA student campus sustainability grant will provide funds to install regionally appropriate fruiting trees and shrubs near Lake Herrick to provide experiential learning, on-site education and long-term fruit foraging opportunities for students and visitors. CAES News
A UGA student campus sustainability grant will provide funds to install regionally appropriate fruiting trees and shrubs near Lake Herrick to provide experiential learning, on-site education and long-term fruit foraging opportunities for students and visitors.
Students awarded campus sustainability grants
A University of Georgia student-led project hopes to produce fruitful results with an edible landscape near Lake Herrick.
Natural predators from turf lawns were placed in petri dishes where the marks made by the insects were preserved in soft clay. CAES News
Natural predators from turf lawns were placed in petri dishes where the marks made by the insects were preserved in soft clay.
Clay models track the activity of beneficial insects in turfgrass
Modeling clay isn’t limited to art classrooms and sculpting studios. University of Georgia researchers developed a tool to track beneficial insects in turfgrass systems using clay models. Tracking these good predators can help develop eco-friendly pest management techniques for both home lawns and commercial sod growers.
Schematic representation of the secretion pathways of plant CLE peptides and their mimicry injected by nematodes into the plant cell cytoplasm.— © New Phytologist CAES News
Schematic representation of the secretion pathways of plant CLE peptides and their mimicry injected by nematodes into the plant cell cytoplasm.— © New Phytologist
Invisible pest causes more than $1 billion in crop losses by taking control of plants’ natural processes
A newly published study led by researchers from the University of Georgia and several partner institutions reveals a discovery that could lead to new control strategies for a tiny-but-persistent agricultural pest that causes enormous soybean losses.
Radon levels in Georgia counties based on data from tests from four radon labs from January 1990 through December 2019. Counties with fewer than 15 radon tests are not included. CAES News
Radon levels in Georgia counties based on data from tests from four radon labs from January 1990 through December 2019. Counties with fewer than 15 radon tests are not included.
Homeowners should test for deadly, invisible gas
As it is every year, January is National Radon Action month. However, this year feels different, as many people are spending more time at home to keep each other safe and healthy. This makes it even more important that we test our homes for radon, a colorless, odorless gas that is the second-leading cause of lung cancer.
Oglethorpe County 4-H’ers prepared animal-safe treats to donate to a local animal rescue shelter. CAES News
Oglethorpe County 4-H’ers prepared animal-safe treats to donate to a local animal rescue shelter.
4-H Cooking to Share helps rescue animals
In Oglethorpe County, 4-H’ers have met monthly for the past seven years as a part of the Georgia 4-H Cooking to Share initiative, which challenges 4-H’ers across the state to develop cooking skills by preparing food for families in need. This past program year, more than 60 families benefited from this project in Oglethorpe County. To adapt to COVID-19 restrictions, 4-H'ers began preparing animal-safe treats for a local animal shelter.
A 4S student from Reynaldo Salinas Institute in Honduras poses with produce he grew at home through the Honduras 4S From Home program. CAES News
A 4S student from Reynaldo Salinas Institute in Honduras poses with produce he grew at home through the Honduras 4S From Home program.
UGA Extension partners with universities to bring 4-H to Latin America
The University of Georgia, The Ohio State University and Zamorano Pan-American Agricultural University, a private university in Honduras, partnered to facilitate 4-H programming during the COVID-19 pandemic at six Honduran schools, reaching 180 students.
An eight-year-old Momi fir in a test plot on the UGA Griffin campus that is part of research by Mark Czarnota and his team to develop a heat-resistant, disease-resistant fir species for the Christmas tree, ornamental and timber industries. CAES News
An eight-year-old Momi fir in a test plot on the UGA Griffin campus that is part of research by Mark Czarnota and his team to develop a heat-resistant, disease-resistant fir species for the Christmas tree, ornamental and timber industries.
A Southern fir Christmas tree is on the horizon for ornamental and timber industries
During the holiday season in the U.S., more than 20 million freshly cut Christmas trees are sold every year, with fir trees topping the most-desired list. Unfortunately growers cannot meet the needs of consumers, and every year, there is a shortage of trees, primarily due to the incredible losses of susceptible firs — including balsam, Fraser, Canaan and others — to the root fungus Phytophthora.
Whether it involves walking, yoga or dancing like no one is watching, physical activity can have a significant impact on your mental health, decrease blood pressure and lower blood sugar levels. CAES News
Whether it involves walking, yoga or dancing like no one is watching, physical activity can have a significant impact on your mental health, decrease blood pressure and lower blood sugar levels.
Practice self-care to combat holiday stress
Whether you are planning to celebrate the holidays face-to-face or virtually, it is understandable if you are feeling mentally drained. As we face the challenges of navigating the holidays safely, there are a variety of ways to focus on mental health.
The Christmas cactus is made up of colorful, iridescent bracts. This true cactus, minus thorns, is native to the South American rainforest. CAES News
The Christmas cactus is made up of colorful, iridescent bracts. This true cactus, minus thorns, is native to the South American rainforest.
How to keep your holiday plants healthy year-round
As vibrant holiday plants begin to adorn the shelves of hardware stores, grocery stores and garden centers, consumers are attracted to the pinks, reds and whites atop deep green foliage, which add festive pops of color in winter homes. The appearance of plants like poinsettias and Christmas cacti usher in the holiday season and we love to fill our halls and entryways with their holiday cheer. But what about after the holidays?

About the Newswire

The CAES newswire features the latest popular science and lifestyle stories relating to agricultural, consumer and environmental sciences as well as UGA Extension programs and services around the state.

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