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Takeout is a good choice to lower risk of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. CAES News
Takeout is a good choice to lower risk of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
UGA food safety expert: takeout is a low-risk option
Buying takeout food is a good choice to lower risks of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a UGA Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
Georgia farmers will soon be harvesting their cotton crop. It's important for cotton producers to know when to defoliate to speed up the crop's maturity process. CAES News
Georgia farmers will soon be harvesting their cotton crop. It's important for cotton producers to know when to defoliate to speed up the crop's maturity process.
Cotton prices may suffer during pandemic
An investors’ recent pessimism in reaction to coronavirus has induced a business slowdown, the pandemic has cast a shadow on the cotton market as well. May cotton futures for old crops closed at 54.93 cents per pound, and new crop December futures closed at 56.10 cents per pound on March 19.
Plugged into 4-H CAES News
Plugged into 4-H
Georgia 4-H prepares daily lessons for Georgia students learning at home
Public schools across Georgia are closed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and many parents are scrambling to help with schoolwork. To help parents and to continue providing youth development resources to children across the state, the Georgia 4-H program is delivering daily online 4-H activities.
Walks, jogs or bike rides around the neighborhood or local parks during social distancing are permitted by public health officials, as long as the minimum 6 feet of distance between other people is maintained. CAES News
Walks, jogs or bike rides around the neighborhood or local parks during social distancing are permitted by public health officials, as long as the minimum 6 feet of distance between other people is maintained.
Boost your physical activity during social distancing
Following social distancing guidelines put in place due to COVID-19 doesn’t mean you have to stop being active, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Nutrition and Health Specialist Ali Berg.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees.
"Toothpicks" sure sign of Ambrosia beetles in pecan trees
Georgia pecan growers should be monitoring for ambrosia beetle now, especially if they have planted new trees or their orchards include trees that are less than three years old. The tell-tale sawdust “toothpicks” sticking out of trees is a sure sign of ambrosia beetles boring into trees.
Calvin Perry, superintendent of Stripling Irrigation Research Park, examines an irrigation box in this 2014 photo. CAES News
Calvin Perry, superintendent of Stripling Irrigation Research Park, examines an irrigation box in this 2014 photo.
UGA Extension helps Georgia improve water usage efficiency
For the past three decades, Alabama, Florida and Georgia have been battling over control of water resources in what has become known as the “tri-state water wars.” Judge Paul Kelly of New Mexico, a Supreme Court-appointed expert known as a “special master,” recently ruled in favor of Georgia in the ongoing Florida vs. Georgia court case.
Precision agriculture researcher and UGA Professor George Vellidis works with graduate student Anna Orfanou on checking the circuit board of a UGA Smart Sensor Array node. CAES News
Precision agriculture researcher and UGA Professor George Vellidis works with graduate student Anna Orfanou on checking the circuit board of a UGA Smart Sensor Array node.
George Vellidis named University Professor
George Vellidis, professor in the department of crop and soil sciences in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has been named University Professor, a title bestowed on those who have had a significant impact on the university in addition to fulfilling their normal academic responsibilities.
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm.
Stock food and water supplies in preparation for emergencies
News of the coronavirus has many people feeling uneasy and helpless. Building a supply of emergency food and water is a task University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say will help Georgians prepare for any kind of emergency, be it a medical quarantine, a snowstorm or a major power outage.
Flooding, plumbing leaks and roof leaks are common causes of mold growing indoors. Mold can trigger asthma attacks in people who are allergic or sensitive to molds. UGA Extension experts say that to help prevent mold from growing, water-damaged areas should be dried out within 48 hours of the event. This photo shows mold and mushrooms growing in a basement that was filled with flood water. CAES News
Flooding, plumbing leaks and roof leaks are common causes of mold growing indoors. Mold can trigger asthma attacks in people who are allergic or sensitive to molds. UGA Extension experts say that to help prevent mold from growing, water-damaged areas should be dried out within 48 hours of the event. This photo shows mold and mushrooms growing in a basement that was filled with flood water.
UGA Extension offers mold removal tips
Following weeks of rain across many parts of the Peach State and more in the forecast, many Georgians find themselves dealing with flooded basements, backed-up septic systems, standing water, mold, mud, mud and more mud.

About the Newswire

The CAES newswire features the latest popular science and lifestyle stories relating to agricultural, consumer and environmental sciences as well as UGA Extension programs and services around the state.

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