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Christmas lights are a normal part of celebrating during the Holiday season. CAES News
Holiday Safety
The holiday season is a great time for families to get together to decorate and celebrate. If celebrating is a family affair, safety can be too.
Freshly cut Christmas trees line Lowes in Griffin in this file photo. CAES News
Christmas Trees
The holiday season is officially upon us. After a huge turkey dinner, many families begin decorating their homes. For many, the Christmas tree is the centerpiece of decorating and more and more people are choosing live trees.
Christmas lights are a normal part of celebrating during the Holiday season. CAES News
Energy Efficiency
University of Georgia scientist Craig Kvien, the creative mind behind Future Farmstead, believes that Georgia homeowners can reduce their power bill this holiday season just by being more sensitive to the amount of energy they’re using.
When it comes to staying hydrated, water remains the best choice. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say electrolyte replacement drinks are usually only needed if you participate in intense, strenuous activity for more than 90 minutes. CAES News
Emergency Water
Most Americans take for granted having fresh, clean water to drink, but that valuable resource isn’t guaranteed during times of emergency. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension expert Gary Hawkins says, no matter whether your drinking water comes from a private well or a municipal source, having an emergency supply of water is something everyone should have.
Pest control operators across the state and the Southeast attend a variety of workshops offered throughout the year by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. A major component of these classes is insect identification. CAES News
Pest-free Schools
The school year has begun, and with it, schools are experiencing an influx of dirt, germs and pests. On Aug. 23, the University of Georgia Structural Pest Management Program (SPM) hosted a School Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Workshop intended to help pest control operators that manage schools in Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina and Tennessee.
Turkestan cockroach, Blatta lateralis, a cockroach species from Turkey has been recorded for the first time in Georgia, according to University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences entomologist Dan Suiter. Photo by Lisa Ames, UGA Cooperative Extension. CAES News
New Roach
A new cockroach species from Turkey has been recorded for the first time in Georgia, according to University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences entomologist Dan Suiter.
Millipedes are often called “thousand-legged worms.” They don't carry diseases that affect people, animals or plants, but some species are capable of secreting chemicals that can irritate the skin and eyes and cause allergic reactions. CAES News
Creepy Crawlers
Millipedes and centipedes often come indoors and strike fear in homeowners. Millipedes aren’t poisonous, but some species can secrete chemicals that can irritate the skin and eyes and cause allergic reactions. Centipedes seldom bite, but their jaws contain poison glands.
Mosquitoes feed on sugar water in Mark Brown's endocrinology lab on UGA's Athens campus. CAES News
Mosquito Season
Georgians only face a few more weeks of mosquito season, but the state’s residents need to stay vigilant to keep mosquito populations in check.
Flor Campos-Robles, a fifth-grade Clarke County 4-H member from Athens, Georgia, won third place with her poster featuring a house that appears to be feeling under weather and warns about the dangers of radon. CAES News
Radon Poster Contest
Household radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., but the hazards of this dangerous gas are still relatively unknown to many Georgia families.
Spending a summer day in the Georgia wilderness is more fun when you're prepared for the heat, humidity and sun. CAES News
Outdoor Safety
Kyle Woosnam knows a thing or two about having fun outside and safely making it home by the end of the day.