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The UGArden’s Medicinal Herb Program markets 10 locally grown teas, including this exam season favorite. CAES News
Medicinal Herbs
In the last year, the medicinal herb program at UGArden, the University of Georgia’s student-run farm, has expanded its product line and the number of students involved has expanded rapidly.
Pine trees toppled over after Hurricane Michael in Wilcox County, Georgia. CAES News
Timber
The Georgia Forestry Commission estimates that 2.4 million acres of timber were damaged by Hurricane Michael. This equates to $763 million in direct losses.
Leyland cypress trees grow as a property border in a lawn in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
New Plants
Now is the best time of the year to install new trees, shrubs and perennial plants. Although cold weather won’t allow the aboveground parts to grow much, the roots will continue to grow and expand, allowing the plant to become established. By next summer, these trees and plants will be able to tolerate the intense heat and dry conditions.
Freshly cut Christmas trees line Lowes in Griffin in this file photo. CAES News
Christmas Trees
The holiday season is officially upon us. After a huge turkey dinner, many families begin decorating their homes. For many, the Christmas tree is the centerpiece of decorating and more and more people are choosing live trees.
August 8, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will host a tour of four northeast Georgia vineyards, focusing on the cultivation practices and grape varieties that have made Georgia's burgeoning wine industry possible. CAES News
Grape Growers
With the growth and increased marketability of the state’s wine industry, Athens, Georgia, is hosting new conferences that will focus on how to create quality fruit and turn it into a palatable beverage. The Southeastern Regional New Grape Growers Conference will be held at the University of Georgia’s South Milledge Greenhouse Complex in Athens on Dec. 11.
Jessie Holbrook of Union County, who submitted a pumpkin weighing 644 pounds, took first place in the Georgia 4-H pumpkin-growing contest this year.  CAES News
Giant Pumpkins
Pumpkins are a staple of the fall season. Some people like pumpkins baked in pie, and some like them carved and lit up on their front porches for Halloween. Georgia 4-H’ers, on the other hand, like them to weigh hundreds of pounds. 
Grow It Know It students Lucy Gibson, a junior in the Clarke Central High School; Jean Ayala Figueroa, an 8th grader at Clarke Middle School; Destiny Strickland, 8th grade at Coile Middle School and Mara Smith, a freshman at Clarke Central High School represent the Grow It Know It program celebrate Georgia Organic's Golden Radish Awards on Oct. 22. CAES News
Grow It Know It
Anyone who has ever been to a meal prepared by Clarke County Schools’ Grow It Know It students knows that the program is special, and now the state knows as well. 
Tammy Cheely, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension county coordinator for Warren County; Scott Richardson, technical education and nutrition director for Warren County Schools; Becky Griffin, UGA Extension community and school garden coordinator and Laura Perry Johnson, associate dean and director of UGA Extension celebrate the presentation of UGA Extensions inaugural Golden Radish Outstanding Extension Farm to School Program Award. CAES News
Golden Radish
The traditional thinking about farm-to-school programs is that they only thrive in suburban or urban school districts with plenty of money and resources.
Don't let fire ants ruin your afternoons. CAES News
Fire Ants
Fire ant populations are high in the fall and ants haven’t yet burrowed deep into the soil for winter. Among others, these are the reasons University of Georgia entomologists say that now is the perfect time to treat for them.
Unlike bagged manure, CAES News
Soil Mixes
Soil tests, provided by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, give gardeners the recipes for successful gardens. Soil amendments, like river sand, mushroom compost, horse manure, coffee grounds, chicken litter and wood ash, can give the soil a much-needed nutrient boost.