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UGA Extension Master Gardeners gather at their annual conference in April at UGA's State Botanical Garden of Georgia in Athens. To celebrate 40 years of service, they hosted David Gibby, far right, who founded the nation's first Master Gardener program in 1972. CAES News
UGA Extension Master Gardeners gather at their annual conference in April at UGA's State Botanical Garden of Georgia in Athens. To celebrate 40 years of service, they hosted David Gibby, far right, who founded the nation's first Master Gardener program in 1972.
Master Gardeners Milestone
For the past 40 years, Georgians have been helping their friends and neighbors build better landscapes, plant healthier gardens and protect their local ecosystems through the University of Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer program.
Small tomatoes growing on vine CAES News
Small tomatoes growing on vine
Tomato Types
The desire for fresh, homegrown tomatoes is the main reason many homeowners plant gardens. Most tomato plants are planted in late March and April, and every spring some homeowners run into problems with their tomato plants.
Too much water can hurt lawns and crop production just as much as not enough water would do. CAES News
Too much water can hurt lawns and crop production just as much as not enough water would do.
Irrigation App
University of Georgia scientists have created a new app to help Georgia vegetable growers irrigate their crops more efficiently.
UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks about weed research during a field day. CAES News
UGA Extension weed scientist Stanley Culpepper speaks about weed research during a field day.
PSO Awards
Eight University of Georgia faculty and staff were honored for exemplary service to the state during Monday’s 2019 Public Service and Outreach awards luncheon, which included awards for Entrepreneur of the Year and Donor Impact.
Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp presented the 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year award to Crawford County farmer Robert Dickey during a reception held Tuesday, March 19, at the Georgia Freight Depot in Atlanta. Pictured left to right are Kemp, Dickey, Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black and UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Sam Pardue. CAES News
Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp presented the 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year award to Crawford County farmer Robert Dickey during a reception held Tuesday, March 19, at the Georgia Freight Depot in Atlanta. Pictured left to right are Kemp, Dickey, Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black and UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Sam Pardue.
Top Farmer
Crawford County peach farmer Robert Dickey has been named the 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year. A fourth-generation farmer, Dickey manages approximately 1,000 acres of peaches and 3,000 acres of timberland with the help of his 90-year-old father, Bob Dickey, his wife, Cynde Dickey, and their son and daughter-in-law, Lee and Stacy Dickey.
Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood CAES News
Fire ants scurry along a piece of wood
Spring Ant Control
Whether you have a well-manicured lawn or a wild preserve, almost every landscape in Georgia shares one feature: fire ants.
Basil is one of several herbs recommended for gardening this spring. It's an annual that prefers sun and moderate moisture. CAES News
Basil is one of several herbs recommended for gardening this spring. It's an annual that prefers sun and moderate moisture.
Spring Herbs
Humans have used herbs since early times for medicinal purposes, for flavoring food and for fragrance. Their magical properties are entwined in the lore of many cultures and their flavor has added distinctive character to numerous regional dishes. Many modern medicines include plant parts from herbs in either a natural or synthesized state. And there is a growing field of research in pharmacognosy, as scientists look again at herbal remedies.
Irrigation of research plots on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. Be careful not to apply too much water as it can be just as costly as under watering. CAES News
Irrigation of research plots on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. Be careful not to apply too much water as it can be just as costly as under watering.
Soil Sensors
Farmers know water is a valuable resource, and many farmers are now using soil sensors in their fields to control soil moisture content. Small-plot and home gardeners can take a cue from professional farmers by becoming more conscientious about when they apply irrigation to home landscapes and gardens throughout spring and summer, says Andre da Silva, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist.
Controlling the erosion of your soil can improve your vegetable garden and protect the soil. Soil erosion is related to multiple factors, including the type of soil and how much cover is holding the soil. CAES News
Controlling the erosion of your soil can improve your vegetable garden and protect the soil. Soil erosion is related to multiple factors, including the type of soil and how much cover is holding the soil.
Soil Erosion
The key to successfully growing delicious vegetables is maintaining high-quality soil. We sometimes neglect to protect our soil, then rainfall comes and erosion carries our crops away. Erosion control is something that must be considered in gardens because it can protect the precious soils.
Hydrangea paniculata varieties, like 'Chantilly Lace' and 'Pink Winky', have both sterile and fertile flowers and attract a lot of bees, butterflies and other pollinators. CAES News
Hydrangea paniculata varieties, like 'Chantilly Lace' and 'Pink Winky', have both sterile and fertile flowers and attract a lot of bees, butterflies and other pollinators.
Pollinator Census
With the University of Georgia’s Great Georgia Pollinator Census just six months away, this spring may be the perfect time for Georgians to make some upgrades to the pollinator habitats in their landscapes.