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Don't let fire ants ruin your afternoons. CAES News
Fire Ants
Fire ant populations are high in the fall and ants haven’t yet burrowed deep into the soil for winter. Among others, these are the reasons University of Georgia entomologists say that now is the perfect time to treat for them.
Unlike bagged manure, CAES News
Soil Mixes
Soil tests, provided by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, give gardeners the recipes for successful gardens. Soil amendments, like river sand, mushroom compost, horse manure, coffee grounds, chicken litter and wood ash, can give the soil a much-needed nutrient boost.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Turfgrass Specialist Clint Waltz is currently using an “automower” on the lawn just outside the new UGA Turfgrass Research Facility on the UGA Griffin campus. The Husqvarna mower is on loan from Georgia sod producer Super-Sod, so Waltz can observe and evaluate the concept of “continual” mowing. CAES News
'Automower'
If you dread mowing the lawn, a new battery-operated mower, much like the popular Rumba vacuum cleaner, may be the product of your dreams. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Turfgrass Specialist Clint Waltz is reviewing it.
Adding flowering plants isn't the only way to add fragrance to landscapes. Trees, like this Chionanthus virginicus (white fringetree or grancy graybeard), can also provide beautiful and fragrant flowers. CAES News
Fragrant Garden
Planting a fragrant garden can be pleasant to your sense of smell and attract insects, bats, and hummingbird pollinators. Fragrance strength and quality can be affected by environmental factors such as humidity, soil moisture and nutrients.
Native azaleas typically have tubular flowers with long stamens that extend beyond their petals. University of Georgia scientist Carol Robacker is studying many of the native azaleas that grow in the Piedmont region to determine which ones are adapted to Georgia. CAES News
Fall Transplanting
Fall and early winter are the best time to relocate large trees and shrubs. Moving established plants from one location to another can change your landscape without costing you money.
Collards are a true Southern favorite and in they grow well in Georgia fall vegetable gardens. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts recommend planting Collard 'Blue Max', 'Georgia Southern' or 'Hevi-Crop,' all varieties shown to perform well in Georgia. CAES News
Fall Veggies
Some fall vegetables are best purchased as transplants. These include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower. Vegetables that can be planted as seeds include beets, bunching onions, carrots, collards, kale, lettuce, mustard, radishes, spinach, Swiss chard and turnips.
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say before planting seeds or transplants, first have your soil tested. After adding the recommended nutrients, then select plant varieties that are known to perform well in Georgia. CAES News
Sun & Soil
Before planting a fall garden, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialists say select a spot that gets a lot of sun, have your soil tested and plant Georgia-friendly varieties.
In CAES News
Sustainable Gardening
“Sustainable Gardening for the Southeast" is set for Sept. 8 at the Monastery of the Holy Spirit in Conyers, Georgia. The full-day workshop will begin at 8:30 a.m. and conclude by 3:30 p.m.
Patrick McCullough, UGA Extension weed specialist, was among the scientists who shared their findings at the UGA Turfgrass Research Field Day held on Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018. McCullough is shown telling visitors the results of his study on bluegrass control in Bermuda grass. CAES News
Turfgrass Updates
The University of Georgia Turfgrass Research Field Day, held Aug. 9 on the UGA Griffin campus, provided research-based information about the production and management of turfgrass from UGA scientists and UGA Extension specialists.
Argentine ants feeds on Terro liquid bait CAES News
Insect ID
Have you ever spotted a bug in your house and not known what it was? The University of Georgia Structural Pest Management Program (SPM) hosts annual integrated pest management (IPM) workshops focused on the home to help pest control operators identify and manage household pests.