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Corn plants are surrounded by water in a field in Kansas in 2014. Heavy rains leave farmers with no way to get in their fields to tend or harvest their crops. CAES News
Corn plants are surrounded by water in a field in Kansas in 2014. Heavy rains leave farmers with no way to get in their fields to tend or harvest their crops.
Wet soil
Rainfall from Hurricane Matthew has left soil in coastal south Georgia completely saturated. Rainy conditions like these wreak havoc on gardeners and farmers who need to do yard or field work. In many cases, the best way to deal with the situation is to wait for drier conditions.
Corn is harvested on the UGA Tifton Campus on August 11, 2016. CAES News
Corn is harvested on the UGA Tifton Campus on August 11, 2016.
Corn Production
Georgia’s field corn acreage is up and yields should be strong, but prices remain disappointingly low for producers, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko.
CAES News
Ag Tour
From watching how a peach is picked, packaged and delivered, to learning how federal and state regulators ensure that only the highest quality produce is shipped from Georgia, the fourth annual state agriculture tour covered a wide range of agricultural topics.
GM crops chart CAES News
GM crops chart
GMO Safety
Genetically modified foods are tested for safety testing before they reach the marketplace. It can take over a decade and cost tens of millions of dollars, and as a result, GMOs are the most safety-tested foods in history, says University of Georgia plant breeding and plant genetics expert Wayne Parrott.
Esther van der Knaap, professor of horticulture, was one of the many UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers who helped the college break its external research funding record in fiscal year 2016. CAES News
Esther van der Knaap, professor of horticulture, was one of the many UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers who helped the college break its external research funding record in fiscal year 2016.
Research Funding
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences broke records in fiscal year 2016 with $69 million in external funding to fuel college projects.
Professor Nick Hill harvests corn from his test plots at the J. Phil Campbell Research and Education Center in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Professor Nick Hill harvests corn from his test plots at the J. Phil Campbell Research and Education Center in Watkinsville, Georgia.
Corn Boil
The University of Georgia faculty and staff at the J. Phil Campbell Sr. Research and Education Center in Watkinsville will host the center’s annual corn boil and open house on June 28 from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Georgia's April 2016 Precipitation - NOAA CAES News
Georgia's April 2016 Precipitation - NOAA
April Weather
Cool conditions early in April delayed the growth of watermelon seedlings and caused yellowing of some corn plants. Wet fields in the southern half of the state delayed planting and caused problems for corn seedlings and other plants in heavy, wet soils.
Green beans grow up a trellis in a Spalding County, Ga., garden. CAES News
Green beans grow up a trellis in a Spalding County, Ga., garden.
Garden Plan
This time of the year gardeners get excited about their soon-to-be-planted spring vegetable gardens. They envision lush rows of perfect pods of peas, scrumptiously delicious sweet corn and big, beautiful tomatoes. University of Georgia Extension urges gardeners to wait and put some thought and vision into their garden first.
Over the course of February, swaths of northwest and southeast Georgia received as much as three or four inches more rainfall than normal, leaving some farm fields that have reached the planting milestone of 55 degrees Fahrenheit too wet to plant. CAES News
Over the course of February, swaths of northwest and southeast Georgia received as much as three or four inches more rainfall than normal, leaving some farm fields that have reached the planting milestone of 55 degrees Fahrenheit too wet to plant.
February's Variable Rains
Overly wet weather in Georgia’s major row crop regions during February 2016 has farmers worried that soggy soil may delay corn and peanut planting or cause fungal diseases to be a major issue later this spring.
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach. CAES News
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach.
Produce and Pathogens
Mike Doyle doesn’t eat raw bean sprouts, medium-rare hamburgers or bagged salads. He isn’t on a special diet, but as director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, he studies the food pathogens that sicken thousands of Americans each year. For a time, foodborne illness was most often connected with undercooked meats; today, 33 percent of cases are tracked back to raw produce.