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UGA Extension entomologist Phillip Roberts speaking at a field day in Midville, Georgia. CAES News
UGA Extension entomologist Phillip Roberts speaking at a field day in Midville, Georgia.
Midville Field Day
Applied research related to four of the state’s major row crops will be presented to southeast Georgia farmers at the annual Southeast Georgia Research and Education Center (SGREC) Field Day in Midville, Georgia, on Wednesday, Aug. 9.
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf. CAES News
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf.
Whiteflies
Populations of whiteflies are “unusually high” in Georgia cotton fields this season, making early detection and management of whiteflies essential, according to University of Georgia entomologists Phillip Roberts and Stormy Sparks.
Cotton being watered on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. CAES News
Cotton being watered on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014.
SIRP Field Day
University of Georgia research on the use of irrigation in high-value Georgia crops, like cotton, peanuts, soybeans and corn, will be at the center of the annual field day at C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park (SIRP) in Camilla, Georgia, on Thursday, July 27. The event is set to begin at 9 a.m. and conclude at 2 p.m.
Since about half of Georgia's peanuts are produced on dry land, or land without access to irrigation, growers rely on rain to produce a good crop. CAES News
Since about half of Georgia's peanuts are produced on dry land, or land without access to irrigation, growers rely on rain to produce a good crop.
Burrower Bug
Through part of a $12.1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney is studying the biology of the burrower bug and developing an effective management program.
Cotton being harvested. CAES News
Cotton being harvested.
Cotton Diseases
In addition to root-knot nematodes and target spot disease, Georgia cotton farmers should be prepared to fight bacterial blight, said University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait.
Beware of burrweed in your lawn. CAES News
Beware of burrweed in your lawn.
Drought & Lawns
Last year’s prolonged drought has extended into this year. Lawns that were in poor health before the drought are having trouble greening up now. If you’re reviving a spotty lawn, perk it up with help from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.  
Twenty-one CAES graduate students hit the road in May to explore crop protection career opportunities in Florida. CAES News
Twenty-one CAES graduate students hit the road in May to explore crop protection career opportunities in Florida.
Crop Protection Careers
The search for a perfect job can feel like a major quest. That quest turns literal for a group of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) students for one week each summer.
Black shank disease badly affected this tobacco field in Coffee County, Georgia. CAES News
Black shank disease badly affected this tobacco field in Coffee County, Georgia.
Black Shank Disease
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension research trials of new tobacco varieties could help farmers reduce the level of black shank disease in their fields to 15 percent, according to Tony Barnes, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension agent in Atkinson County, Georgia.
The UGA Tifton campus released the 'Cowboy' perennial peanut, which produces robust, yellow blooms. CAES News
The UGA Tifton campus released the 'Cowboy' perennial peanut, which produces robust, yellow blooms.
'Cowboy' Perennial Peanut
The University of Georgia-bred ‘Cowboy’ perennial peanut plant doesn’t produce edible peanuts, but this new cultivar offers homeowners a colorful addition to ornamental beds and a supplemental source of nitrogen for surrounding grasses.
David Bertioli, an International Peanut Genome Initiative plant geneticist of the Universidade de Brasília, has joined the faculty of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Bertioli first came to UGA in 2013 as a visiting professor. CAES News
David Bertioli, an International Peanut Genome Initiative plant geneticist of the Universidade de Brasília, has joined the faculty of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Bertioli first came to UGA in 2013 as a visiting professor.
GRA Distinguished Investigator
David Bertioli, a world-class expert in the genetics and genomics of peanut species, will join the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences as a professor and the university’s first Georgia Research Alliance Distinguished Investigator.