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University of Georgia Professor Paul Raymer has served Georgia agriculture as a variety tester, a soybean specialist, a canola breeder and a turfgrass breeder. For the past 15 years, he has focused on developing improved cultivars of seashore paspalum, tall fescue and creeping bentgrass for high-stress environments. CAES News
University of Georgia Professor Paul Raymer has served Georgia agriculture as a variety tester, a soybean specialist, a canola breeder and a turfgrass breeder. For the past 15 years, he has focused on developing improved cultivars of seashore paspalum, tall fescue and creeping bentgrass for high-stress environments.
Paul Raymer
More than 40 years ago, a young man from Arkansas decided to become an agriculture major because "it was the beginning of the Green Revolution, and agriculture had a bright future." Today that man, University of Georgia professor Paul Raymer, has served Georgia agriculture as a variety tester, a soybean specialist, a canola breeder and a turfgrass breeder.
UGA turfgrass breeder Brian Schwartz (right) examines research plots during the turfgrass conference held in 2013. CAES News
UGA turfgrass breeder Brian Schwartz (right) examines research plots during the turfgrass conference held in 2013.
Turfgrass Conference
The 72nd annual University of Georgia Southeastern Turfgrass Conference will be held on Thursday, April 26, at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton, Georgia.
The University of Georgia has received a $14 million grant from the U.S. Agency of International Development to manage the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut Research, known as the “Peanut Lab,” a global peanut research program that works to alleviate hunger by helping farmers in developing countries grow healthy crops. The agreement builds on UGA and USAID's long-standing partnership on global peanut research, which dates back to the 1980s. CAES News
The University of Georgia has received a $14 million grant from the U.S. Agency of International Development to manage the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut Research, known as the “Peanut Lab,” a global peanut research program that works to alleviate hunger by helping farmers in developing countries grow healthy crops. The agreement builds on UGA and USAID's long-standing partnership on global peanut research, which dates back to the 1980s.
Peanut IL tweaks RFP
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut has dropped a request that project proposals initially explain how they will use outputs from commissioned projects, since the details of those commissioned projects are not yet available. Concept notes on project proposals are due April 20 for scientists who would like to lead a project in the $14 million, five-year Peanut Innovation Lab program.
Corn planting at the Bowen Farm in Tifton, Georgia on March 29, 2018. CAES News
Corn planting at the Bowen Farm in Tifton, Georgia on March 29, 2018.
Planter Adjustments
Adjusting planting equipment from one field to the next can make the difference between a healthy crop stand and a poor stand, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension precision agriculture and irrigation specialist Wes Porter.
CAES News
Project RFPs
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut Research is calling for concept notes in two Areas of Inquiry: varietal development and value-added gains.
Picture of wheat research trial being conducted by Reagan Noland and Dennis Hancock. CAES News
Picture of wheat research trial being conducted by Reagan Noland and Dennis Hancock.
Wheat Crop
Wheat prices are down, and wheat acreage in Georgia is dropping. To boost the state’s wheat industry and help producers get more out of their crop, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension small-grains specialist Reagan Noland is researching a dual-use system that would enable growers to use their wheat crop for grain and forage production.
Cotton roots infected with root-knot nematodes swell in response to the infection. These knots serve as feeding sites where nematodes (microscopic worms) grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant's growth. CAES News
Cotton roots infected with root-knot nematodes swell in response to the infection. These knots serve as feeding sites where nematodes (microscopic worms) grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant's growth.
Nematodes
Mother Nature’s freezing January temperatures reduced nematode buildup in southern Georgia fields. But warmer temperatures this spring could spark nematode activity, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait.
Robert Stougaard is the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He supervises the college's seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state. CAES News
Robert Stougaard is the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He supervises the college's seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state.
Research Assistant Dean
Beginning March 1, Robert N. Stougaard will be the assistant dean of research for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He will be responsible for the overall supervision of the college’s seven research centers and farms and three major agricultural experiment stations located across the state.
A conservation tillage system begins with a cover crop that's planted during the fallow times of the year, such as late fall and early winter when row crops have been harvested. Pictured is corn and rye residue, part of a conservation tillage system on Barry Martin's farm in Hawkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
A conservation tillage system begins with a cover crop that's planted during the fallow times of the year, such as late fall and early winter when row crops have been harvested. Pictured is corn and rye residue, part of a conservation tillage system on Barry Martin's farm in Hawkinsville, Georgia.
Conservation Innovation Grant
A $198,000 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-sponsored Conservation Innovation Grant will support ongoing University of Georgia research on cover crops and the effects of those crops on water quality and availability for row crop production.
CAES Dean Sam Pardue chats with peanut economist Adam Rabinowitz following the Ag Forecast in Lyons, Georgia, on Jan. 30, 2018. CAES News
CAES Dean Sam Pardue chats with peanut economist Adam Rabinowitz following the Ag Forecast in Lyons, Georgia, on Jan. 30, 2018.
Ag Forecast
Commodity updates for high-value row crops like peanuts and cotton highlight this year’s Georgia Ag Forecast meetings, which are currently being held statewide.