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Crawford County ANR and 4-H agent Sarah Greer looks in a sweep net to see if her 4-H student caught any insects. CAES News
Crawford County ANR and 4-H agent Sarah Greer looks in a sweep net to see if her 4-H student caught any insects.
Cotton STEM Workshop
A select group of Georgia 4-H members learned about cotton production and the crop’s global impact as part of a daylong Cotton STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) Workshop held on the University of Georgia Tifton campus on Thursday, July 19.
UGA Cooperative Extension entomologists hosted two insect scouting schools at the Tifton Campus Conference Center and the Southeast Georgia Research and Education Center in Midville, Georgia. CAES News
UGA Cooperative Extension entomologists hosted two insect scouting schools at the Tifton Campus Conference Center and the Southeast Georgia Research and Education Center in Midville, Georgia.
Scouting School
Even in a world of remote-monitoring stations and farm technology, farmers haven’t found anything better than the human eye to identify emerging crop problems.
Stanley Culpepper looks for cotton plants among pigweed at a plot at the Ponder Farm in Tifton, Georgia. CAES News
Stanley Culpepper looks for cotton plants among pigweed at a plot at the Ponder Farm in Tifton, Georgia.
Postemergence Herbicides
Using postemergence herbicides to control problematic weeds has been recently successful for Georgia cotton farmers, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed specialist Stanley Culpepper.
Kudzu bugs overwintering in bark. CAES News
Kudzu bugs overwintering in bark.
Kudzu Bug
A tiny wasp — known as “Paratelenomus saccharalis” — is cutting down kudzu bug populations and Georgia soybean farmers’ need to treat for the pest, according to Michael Toews, a University of Georgia entomologist based on the UGA Tifton campus.
Alex Csinos, Professor Emeritus in Plant Pathology, talks about tobacco during the Tobacco Tour at UGA-Tifton on June 13, 2018. CAES News
Alex Csinos, Professor Emeritus in Plant Pathology, talks about tobacco during the Tobacco Tour at UGA-Tifton on June 13, 2018.
Tobacco Crop
Excessive rainfall in May reduced the potential yield of Georgia’s tobacco crop by as much as 15 percent, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension tobacco agronomist J. Michael Moore.
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
Pam Knox, newly named interim director of the University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, checks the data logger at the weather station on the Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia.
Network Leader
University of Georgia agricultural climatologist Pam Knox has been named interim director of UGA’s network of 86 weather stations across Georgia.
Cotton on the UGA Tifton campus in this 2013 file photo. CAES News
Cotton on the UGA Tifton campus in this 2013 file photo.
Late-Planted Cotton
If Georgia farmers plan to plant cotton, they need to do so as soon as possible. Only 86 percent of the state’s crop has been planted as of June 10, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Crop Progress and Condition Report for Georgia.
Ideally, grass clippings should be recycled into the grass. If a large amount of clippings remain, bagging is the best option. CAES News
Ideally, grass clippings should be recycled into the grass. If a large amount of clippings remain, bagging is the best option.
Messy Lawns
After weeks of rainfall, lawns grew and now mowing may leave a significant volume of clippings behind. If there's too much to rake into the canopy, the clippings should be removed. 
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf. CAES News
Whiteflies seen on a squash leaf.
Whitefly Update
Silverleaf whiteflies devastated Georgia’s cotton and fall vegetable crops last year. In response to this crisis, a team of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences research and UGA Cooperative Extension specialists is studying the pests statewide to help cotton and vegetable farmers avoid another year of disappointing crops.
Peanut plants under water in Plains, Georgia.
May 31, 2018 CAES News
Peanut plants under water in Plains, Georgia.
May 31, 2018
Rainy Impact
Two consecutive weeks of rainfall in Georgia stunted the growth of the state’s peanut crop and created ideal conditions for diseases in vegetable fields, leaving farmers scrambling to decide what to do next.