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Hydrangea paniculata varieties, like 'Chantilly Lace' and 'Pink Winky', have both sterile and fertile flowers and attract a lot of bees, butterflies and other pollinators. CAES News
Hydrangea paniculata varieties, like 'Chantilly Lace' and 'Pink Winky', have both sterile and fertile flowers and attract a lot of bees, butterflies and other pollinators.
UGA Cooperative Extension issues planting suggestions for Great Georgia Pollinator Census
With the University of Georgia’s Great Georgia Pollinator Census just six months away, this spring may be the perfect time for Georgians to make some upgrades to the pollinator habitats in their landscapes.
While bee populations have been declining for the past several decades, urban beekeeping and public awareness of pollinators are on the rise. CAES News
While bee populations have been declining for the past several decades, urban beekeeping and public awareness of pollinators are on the rise.
With six months until the Great Georgia Pollinator Census, UGA needs more citizen scientists
As bees emerge from their nests this spring, have you ever wondered just how many there are out there? If so, you are not alone. University of Georgia entomologists are recruiting an army of citizen scientists to help count Georgia’s pollinators this August.
Chipmunks are territorial and rarely become numerous enough to cause a significant amount of damage. However, when the resources are right, populations can reach 20 individuals or more in an urban landscape and start causing noticeable problems. CAES News
Chipmunks are territorial and rarely become numerous enough to cause a significant amount of damage. However, when the resources are right, populations can reach 20 individuals or more in an urban landscape and start causing noticeable problems.
Chipmunks in the landscape can be a nuisance
Chipmunks may look cute, but when they wreak havoc in the landscape their charm quickly fades. A species of small rodent, chipmunks are quite common in Georgia. They are considered minor agricultural pests, but they can cause significant structural damage under patios, stairs and retention walls.
Pictured are Brian Hayes, Mitchell County Extension agent and county Extension coordinator; Monica Kilpatrick, state coordinator for Georgia Project WET; Debra Cox, Mitchell County 4-H Extension educator; Jennifer Grogan, retired Mitchell County 4-H agent and county Extension coordinator; and Calvin Perry, UGA C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park superintendent. CAES News
Pictured are Brian Hayes, Mitchell County Extension agent and county Extension coordinator; Monica Kilpatrick, state coordinator for Georgia Project WET; Debra Cox, Mitchell County 4-H Extension educator; Jennifer Grogan, retired Mitchell County 4-H agent and county Extension coordinator; and Calvin Perry, UGA C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park superintendent.
UGA Mitchell County Extension 4-H, C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park win award from Georgia Project WET
Along with the University of Georgia's C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park, the UGA Cooperative Extension 4-H program in Mitchell County has been named the 2019 Georgia Project WET Organization of the Year for hosting a Georgia 4-H camp designed to teach children the importance of water conservation.
Soil sample bags await processing at the University of Georgia Soil Testing Laboratory in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Soil sample bags await processing at the University of Georgia Soil Testing Laboratory in Athens, Ga.
Don't skip soil testing this spring
This spring, gardeners planning vegetable gardens — or even a major renovation of your ornamental beds — should take the opportunity to test their soil before they put plants in the ground.
Greg Huber (right) is shown teaching a class at the University of Georgia Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens. Participants attended a four-day training modeled after the Georgia Certified Landscape Professional (GCLP) program, which was developed by UGA Cooperative Extension’s Center for Urban Agriculture in Griffin, Georgia. Huber leads the GCLP program. CAES News
Greg Huber (right) is shown teaching a class at the University of Georgia Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens. Participants attended a four-day training modeled after the Georgia Certified Landscape Professional (GCLP) program, which was developed by UGA Cooperative Extension’s Center for Urban Agriculture in Griffin, Georgia. Huber leads the GCLP program.
UGA helps Savannah create green space, train future landscapers
University of Georgia Marine Extension and Georgia Sea Grant is helping restore lost green space to decrease flood risk and to beautify barren spaces while training Savannah, Georgia, residents. UGA Extension specialists taught participants fundamental landscaping skills, including plant identification, planting practices and maintenance in an extensive four-day training.
Pictured are the symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight disease on brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale. Alternaria is a foliar pathogen, and symptoms first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings. CAES News
Pictured are the symptoms of Alternaria leaf blight disease on brassica crops, including broccoli, collard and kale. Alternaria is a foliar pathogen, and symptoms first appear on older leaves as small, dark spots that gradually enlarge with concentric rings.
Fungicide resistance spells trouble for Georgia, Virginia vegetable farmers
Popular vegetables like broccoli and kale are among the crops that could be in danger from Alternaria leaf blight — a disease that can cause spots on some brassica crops and render them unmarketable — which has developed resistance to a once-dependable fungicide Georgia farmers rely on, according to Bhabesh Dutta, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist.
Homegrown tomatoes are one of the most popular fruits available at roadside produce stands. CAES News
Homegrown tomatoes are one of the most popular fruits available at roadside produce stands.
UGA Extension, Georgia Department of Agriculture set produce training workshop
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Department of Agriculture will host a free one-day workshop for produce farmers on Thursday, March 14, at Little Ocmulgee State Park in Helena, Georgia.
Eric Yirenkyi Danquah, founder of the West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI), right, maize field with WACCI co-founder Kwame Offei, center, and maize breeder Martin Adjei. CAES News
Eric Yirenkyi Danquah, founder of the West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI), right, maize field with WACCI co-founder Kwame Offei, center, and maize breeder Martin Adjei.
Founder of West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement to present keynote at UGA CAES International Agriculture Day
Cassava, taro, cowpea: these are the crops that are going fuel the next phase of the green revolution. Today, African researchers are working to develop improved varieties of traditional African crops to meet local food security challenges.

About the Newswire

Formerly referred to as FACES, our media newswire continues to feature stories from the CAES news team relating to family, agricultural, consumer and environmental sciences, as well as UGA Extension news.

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Sharon Dowdy Senior Public Relations Coordinator
Merritt Melancon Public Relations Coordinator
J. Faith Peppers Director of Public Affairs
Clint Thompson Public Relations Coordinator