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Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of excess rainfall this winter, peanut plantings could be delayed in some fields. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of excess rainfall this winter, peanut plantings could be delayed in some fields.
El Nino impacts Georgia agriculture
Farmers who might face a delayed planting season can thank El Niño for Georgia’s exceedingly wet winter, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist. Row crop and vegetable producers usually begin planting their crops in late March through May, but excessive rainfall and cloudy conditions in January and February have left many fields soaked and soggy.
This summer, teens from across the nation will gather in Georgia and Colorado for camps designed just for military kids by the Georgia 4-H Military Partnership. The camps begin in June, but adult volunteer leaders are needed now. CAES News
This summer, teens from across the nation will gather in Georgia and Colorado for camps designed just for military kids by the Georgia 4-H Military Partnership. The camps begin in June, but adult volunteer leaders are needed now.
Military Teen Leadership Summits seek adult volunteers
Georgia 4-H is searching for adult volunteer leaders for this summer’s 2019 Military Teen Summits coordinated by the Georgia 4-H Military Partnership. The summits will occur in Jekyll Island, Georgia, Dahlonega, Georgia, and Estes Park, Colorado, through funding provided by several entities. The camps begin in June and conclude in early-August.
Sam Pardue, dean and director, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Sam Pardue, dean and director, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Making Georgia and CAES No. 1 in Agriculture
As we celebrate National Agriculture Week 2019, many in the Southeast are still struggling to recover from hurricanes, tornadoes, whitefly outbreaks and record-breaking rainfall. Nature is both the nemesis and nurturer of agriculture - the ultimate “can’t live with it, can’t live without it” dilemma.
Basil is one of several herbs recommended for gardening this spring. It's an annual that prefers sun and moderate moisture. CAES News
Basil is one of several herbs recommended for gardening this spring. It's an annual that prefers sun and moderate moisture.
Try planting herbs in your garden
Humans have used herbs since early times for medicinal purposes, for flavoring food and for fragrance. Their magical properties are entwined in the lore of many cultures and their flavor has added distinctive character to numerous regional dishes. Many modern medicines include plant parts from herbs in either a natural or synthesized state. And there is a growing field of research in pharmacognosy, as scientists look again at herbal remedies.
Irrigation of research plots on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. Be careful not to apply too much water as it can be just as costly as under watering. CAES News
Irrigation of research plots on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. Be careful not to apply too much water as it can be just as costly as under watering.
Soil sensors can prevent homeowners from overwatering gardens
Farmers know water is a valuable resource, and many farmers are now using soil sensors in their fields to control soil moisture content. Small-plot and home gardeners can take a cue from professional farmers by becoming more conscientious about when they apply irrigation to home landscapes and gardens throughout spring and summer, says Andre da Silva, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist.
Controlling the erosion of your soil can improve your vegetable garden and protect the soil. Soil erosion is related to multiple factors, including the type of soil and how much cover is holding the soil. CAES News
Controlling the erosion of your soil can improve your vegetable garden and protect the soil. Soil erosion is related to multiple factors, including the type of soil and how much cover is holding the soil.
Controling soil erosion improves vegetable gardens
The key to successfully growing delicious vegetables is maintaining high-quality soil. We sometimes neglect to protect our soil, then rainfall comes and erosion carries our crops away. Erosion control is something that must be considered in gardens because it can protect the precious soils.
This year's El Nino could cause a late frost this spring. Be ready with these tips from UGA Extension. CAES News
This year's El Nino could cause a late frost this spring. Be ready with these tips from UGA Extension.
Zealous gardeners can create a tool kit to protect early plantings from frost
Are the first warm spring days making it impossible to stay out of the garden? There’s no way for a gardener to predict or stop a late frost from hitting after they’ve put in transplants or started counting blooms, but they can be prepared, said Paul Thomas, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension horticulturist. Since no one knows when a frosty night might hit, gardeners should have a frost tool kit and game plan ready.
Hydrangea paniculata varieties, like 'Chantilly Lace' and 'Pink Winky', have both sterile and fertile flowers and attract a lot of bees, butterflies and other pollinators. CAES News
Hydrangea paniculata varieties, like 'Chantilly Lace' and 'Pink Winky', have both sterile and fertile flowers and attract a lot of bees, butterflies and other pollinators.
UGA Cooperative Extension issues planting suggestions for Great Georgia Pollinator Census
With the University of Georgia’s Great Georgia Pollinator Census just six months away, this spring may be the perfect time for Georgians to make some upgrades to the pollinator habitats in their landscapes.
While bee populations have been declining for the past several decades, urban beekeeping and public awareness of pollinators are on the rise. CAES News
While bee populations have been declining for the past several decades, urban beekeeping and public awareness of pollinators are on the rise.
With six months until the Great Georgia Pollinator Census, UGA needs more citizen scientists
As bees emerge from their nests this spring, have you ever wondered just how many there are out there? If so, you are not alone. University of Georgia entomologists are recruiting an army of citizen scientists to help count Georgia’s pollinators this August.

About the Newswire

Formerly referred to as FACES, our media newswire continues to feature stories from the CAES news team relating to family, agricultural, consumer and environmental sciences, as well as UGA Extension news.

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Sharon Dowdy Senior Public Relations Coordinator
Merritt Melancon Public Relations Coordinator
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